Sunday, September 23, 2007

Gifted Exchange Turns 2!

Gifted Exchange Turns 2!

Today this blog celebrates its 2nd birthday. That's pretty good longevity for the genre! We've been averaging just under 3,000 visits a month, to read the roughly two posts per week (this is post 209, apparently) and it's the rare post that goes without a comment. Please keep me updated on what you'd like to see covered, ideas, tips, critiques, etc. And if you've had a favorite post, I'd like to hear that too. Thanks for reading, Laura

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Congratulations! You are doing a fantastic job. It is always great to read your insight as well as that of the readers :)

Anonymous said...

I have just found your blog. I am looking for good information about boarding schools for my 8th grade daughter (She has loved her summers at CTY and now wants to try to go to a better high school than exists in our home town. Her SAT's last year were 690/720) I have, however, just finished reading Restless Virgins about Milton Academy and am frankly appalled. Sorry to be joining in two years late, but I wonder if you have covered these topics??

Leslie said...

Laura,
Thank you for your blog- I love it.
I have no recommendations- most of the topics are helpful and interesting.
Leslie

Anonymous said...

I find it slightly frightening that there is no attention paid to gifted students in higher education. We don't stop being gifted as adults.

Cherylynn McKay said...

Congratulations on your anniversary. Unfortunately I was not aware of this blog until yesterday, when a friend told me she found it when she googled my daughters name. You wrote a blog about an article written about my daughter, Dani d'Spirit January 6 2006. Generally, I found it a very good posting,but, you as well as most able-bodied people did not appear to understand the depth of prejudice that children and adults with physical disabilities endure daily. Dani constantly has to prove and prove again her
competence. People do not address her as a thinking feeling human being. They do not hesitate to have a conversation over her head , that is grossly inappropriate and or condescending.

You said in that 2006 post;
"At least Dani's disabilities are so obvious that they can be recognized and accommodated." The recognition of the "ability" is the first step. That is, for many parents where they depend on the "professionals" who don't know how to see outside the box. Obtaining the appropriate accommodations is the next mountain to climb. The computer system that Dani presently uses is a Sahara tablet computer, with several voice output software programs. It took us over a year of looking and 7 trials of different systems to find this one. We were also abandoned by the "professionals" when we selected this one because it was not a "ACC device" Nothing was covered by insurance or any other funding source.
Please to not take this as a negation of the difficulty that persons with dyslexia and giftedness have in receiving an appropriate education and recognition. I absolutely agree with you on that point. We have also experienced that within our family.
I truly believe that there are many more people out there, with significant physical limitations, who have been labeled mentally retarded. Given the right options of communication and input of information would astonish us all.
I wish you could help to awaken the common public to presume competence of all person regardless of limitations. dsixspirit@earthlink.net